Scandals Continue Casting Spotlight on Sexual Harassment

first_imgCBS Chief Les Moonves has become the latest high-profile executive accused of harassment in the #MeToo era and surely won’t be the last. Six women have accused him of sexual harassment or misconduct from the 1980s to the 2000s. But give Late Show host Stephen Colbert credit for taking time during an opening monologue to address the controversy surrounding Moonves, the man who hired him, head on.“Everybody believes in accountability until it’s their guy, and make no mistake Les Moonves is my guy. He stood behind this show while we were struggling to find our voice, and I like working for him” said Colbert. “But accountability is meaningless unless it’s for everybody—whether it’s the leader of a network or the leader of the free world.”It was fitting that Colbert used his powerful pulpit to make a statement because sexual harassment is so often about power—who has it and who doesn’t. And it would be hard to find someone more powerful in the media industry than Moonves.But as Philadelphia employment attorney Jonathan Segal noted on our most recent XpertHR podcast, “Sexual Harassment 2.0, Now What?,” power doesn’t just start at the top. “If you’re a $10-an-hour person who works in a hotel and the $12-an-hour employee comes onto you, he has Harvey Weinstein-like power [over that person],” said Segal.Weinstein was the low-hanging fruit that launched the #MeToo movement, a bully and serial predator whose alleged conduct went way beyond the pale. And it remains to be seen where the independent investigation will go surrounding Moonves, a more well-liked executive with a record of promoting women but who nonetheless faces serious claims of forcible kissing, unwanted advances and retaliation.But most cases don’t rise to this level of publicity. And still more fall into an area where there are shades of gray, especially when the harassment claims may have arisen out of a workplace relationship gone bad. Segal also points to hugs in the office as another example.So what role can HR play in investigating sexual harassment claims? In cases against high-level executives, the best course is an outside investigation. But in many other situations, Segal said, HR can be a valuable resource in taking action despite some of the criticism the profession has received. According to Segal, leadership teams need to show that they value HR and that it plays a critical role in decision-making.So long as HR is empowered, he said, then employees will have more confidence in its ability to solve problems, including those involving sexual harassment.“You don’t read about the hundreds of cases where the problems have gone away because HR took appropriate corrective action,” noted Segal. “But no one calls the New York Times and says, ‘HR did a great job.’ And HR often does do a great job.”For more of Segal’s insights on sexual harassment in the workplace and what employers need to know, listen in to the latest XpertHR podcast.Originally posted on XpertHR blog.last_img read more

Reflections on Rancor in Political Discussion

first_imgUnfortunately, there is increased rancor in today’s dialogue about public policy. It is easy to find negativity from politicians, media, and even your friends and neighbors. It is rare to find positive, intelligent, forward-looking events and communities that offer public policy solutions.That’s where you come in. That’s where AFF comes in. And it is how liberty will rise above the noise to prevail in the long term.As I reflect on my six years with America’s Future Foundation, one point of pride is the nature of the people and events associated with it. I do not recall an ad hominem attack at an AFF program or a culture of rancor, even when the most divisive topics were discussed, including immigration and right-to-work. Young people are attracted by intelligent and positive conversation, even if they don’t initially embrace free market ideas.Eric Shierman’s account of the AFF Portland chapter launch confirmed this last week. He wrote,“I made it out to their first event this week and saw something you don’t see every day: a room filled with young people interested in limiting the size and scope of government… It was so refreshing to go to an event about politics that wasn’t filled with anger.”Together, we’ve created a network in 27 cities around the country that counters rancor by offering fun and unique events based on unifying principles: free markets, limited government, and personal responsibility. It provides a unique social community where people come back to learn more and gain valuable advocacy skills.AFF Austin leader Ellen Bartling explains,“The power of AFF’s approach is that it weaves intellectually challenging topics into having a great time; brings experts into more intimate social settings where beginner members feel free to ask earnest questions; and provides opportunities for both intellectual growth and practical, professional growth.”For more than two decades, AFF has incubated the talents not just of our members, but of our leadership as well. Former AFF executive directors and senior leaders now serve in executive positions at leading think tanks, activist groups, and in the private sector. Thousands of other AFF alumni are in positions of influence thanks to donor investment in their education and development.I’m the latest in this line of liberty advocates, and accepted a position as director of foundation relations with the Institute for Humane Studies (IHS), starting September 5, 2017. It’s an incredible opportunity to grow their work to educate students for liberty and empower faculty to make long-term change on campus. This is a personal passion of mine, all the way back to my time as a Young America’s Foundation activist at Ithaca College.It has been an honor to serve AFF these past six years. I am proud of the growth of the organization and everything we’ve accomplished. It’s very exciting to think about all the talented people you and AFF have touched, and the impact they will have over the next 20 to 30 years in the world of ideas. This month’s chapter launches in Portland and Jacksonville are just the latest examples.The board and I are fully committed to finding AFF’s new executive director and equipping him or her with the tools necessary to bring AFF to the next level. Together, we can inspire the Millennial generation to embrace free markets, limited government, and personal responsibility. You can learn more about the search here.Again, thank you for your support, and I look forward to working with you in a new capacity soon.last_img read more

The Itanium Processor and DB2: A secret that shouldn’t be so secret

first_imgThe dust continues to get stirred up following Oracle’s announcement regarding plans for the Itanium processor and HP-UX.  Plenty of authors have been commenting on the subject of late, often concluding that the announcement has negative consequences for HP customers who’ve been relying on Itanium and HP-UX to run their Oracle-based mission-critical database workloads.Far from being on the verge of falling, however, the sky is actually very bright for those customers.That’s because, for pretty much the first time in the history of the enterprise relational database market, those customers have a perfectly viable alternative readily available.That option is IBM DB2.”Why is DB2 a more viable option for an existing Oracle customer today than in the past?” You might well ask – To answer that question, a bit of history is in order.E.F. Codd published his seminal paper – “A Relational Model of Data for Large-Scale Data Banks”, in 1970.  I was only 9 at the time, so it wasn’t on my reading list.  Which proved to be OK, since it took until I had graduated college, some twelve years later, for computers to become powerful enough to handle the compute requirements of processing SQL. Codd worked for IBM at the time his paper was published.  Oracle beat IBM to market with the first SQL database by a small interval, but Oracle and DB2 have been competing with one another basically since DB2’s introduction in 1983.I first installed DB2, on an IBM MVS mainframe, in 1985.  My first Oracle experience was a few years later – ironically enough using OS/2 running on one of the first Compaq SystemPro servers to come off the line.  So I’ve been watching this competition play out for some time.SQL wasn’t standardized at the beginning, so different implementations had different ‘dialects’.  The first ANSI SQL specification came out in 1986.  It has served as the standard definition of what constitutes the SQL language itself ever since, with multiple revisions published over the years. The idea behind a standard definition of the language was to allow for easy portability of applications and database definitions between DBMS’s that implemented the standard.  As long as the applications and database definitions adhered to the standard, went the theory, portability would be preserved.From the very beginning, however, commercial SQL DBMS vendors have provided proprietary ‘extensions’ to their implementations that tempted programmers and DBA’s to sacrifice portability in favor of optimized performance and functionality.The inevitable result was effective lock-in to a particular DBMS. Once programmers and DBAs started down the slippery slope of using proprietary in-database stored procedure languages and SQL semantic extensions, migration between DBMS’s required source-level changes that could be time-consuming, risky, and costly. That was the case until May 19, 2009, when IBM delivered its Oracle compatibilty extensions with DB2 9.7.DB2 9.7, for the first time in the history of Database Management System’s , fully supported almost the entire collection of proprietary extensions to the SQL standard that Oracle’s DBMS provides.  So instead of requiring a complete re-coding and re-testing of applications in order to migrate from Oracle to DB2, customers who wish to migrate from any Oracle database to DB2 merely have to unload their database contents and re-load them into DB2 9.7 – no source code changes or DDL changes required.  It isn’t entirely seamless, since an unload/reload is still required, but the process is vastly less daunting than it ever was before, and much less intrusive than an entire platform change.So if, like tens of thousands of your peers, you’re running the core of your enterprise on HP-UX and Itanium and you’d like to keep doing just that for the foreseeable future, rest assured that you have a viable alternative available – one that’s fully the equal of Oracle’s in terms of suitability for mission-critical workloads.The analyst community has been taking note of the arrival of this new capability.  George Weiss of Gartner Group, commenting on the subject of Oracle’s announcement and its impact on end users, said:”For Oracle applications written internally, you can move to IBM’s DB2 9.7 (and future releases), which contains the Oracle database compatibility feature. This enables Oracle code to run on DB2 unchanged (with about a 97% compatibility as reported by references and Gartner clients).”  (Source: Q&A: The User Impact of Oracle Ceasing Itanium Development; April 5, 2011; George J. Weiss, Andrew Butler, Donald Feinberg)They say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.  If so, Oracle should be feeling very flattered at the moment.  And customers who are currently running Oracle databases on the Itanium processor and HP-UX should feel reassured.The next time your Oracle sales rep shows up to talk about plans for migrating your Oracle databases to a SPARC platform, be sure to have a DB2 9.7 coffee cup prominently positioned on your desk.  Have a chat about your success in moving your Oracle databases and applications to DB2 without any need to change platforms.  Be sure to mention that your modern Itanium-based platforms already significantly outperform anything available using SPARC, and you’re looking forward to the next decade’s worth of continuing improvements from HP and Intel.Should make for an interesting conversation!last_img read more

10 months agoFenerbahce rival Caen for Leicester striker Fousseni Diabate

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Fenerbahce rival Caen for Leicester striker Fousseni Diabateby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveThe race for Leicester City striker Fousseni Diabate is heating up.Caen are keen to set up a loan deal for the 23 year-old next month.However, Le 10 Sport says Caen face competition from Turkish giants Fenerbahce for Diabate.Like Caen, Fener are eager to discuss a loan deal with Leicester for Diabate.The forward joined the Foxes a year ago from Ajaccio. last_img read more

19 days agoReal Madrid boss Zidane delighted with Modric ‘cracker’

first_imgReal Madrid boss Zidane delighted with Modric ‘cracker’by Carlos Volcano19 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid boss Zinedine Zidane was delighted with Luka Modric’s goal for victory over Granada.Modric hit a screamer on the day.Zidane said, “I’m delighted for Modric. He scored a cracker. “He’s got that in his locker, three or four years ago he scored that very same goal in Granada. “He doesn’t always go for it, but with the shot that he’s got on him… he certainly should.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

6 days agoKlinsmann lined up for shock Ecuador move

first_imgKlinsmann lined up for shock Ecuador moveby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Tottenham star Jurgen Klinsmann is being lined up for a shock return to management with Ecuador.Klinsmann has been out of the game for a year since leaving his role with the US men’s national team.The Sun says there is growing speculation in South America that the 55-year-old is on the verge of taking charge of Ecuador instead.The country is looking for a new manager have Hernan Dario Gomez was sacked in July on the back of a disappointing Copa America.Ecuador failed to make it out of the group stages, and under the temporary control of under-20 boss Jorge Celico they have struggled to make any improvement. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Vine: UNC Student Drills The Half-Court Shot On College GameDay

first_imgNorth Carolina student drills half-court shot.Vine/@StephLaurenThe half-court shot on the basketball version of ESPN’s College GameDay is often the highlight of the program, and that is definitely a fact for one lucky North Carolina student today. UNC junior Forrest Reynolds, who also serves as a student manager with the basketball program, took two very strong attempts before absolutely drilling his third shot, netting him $18,000.Kid just made the half court shot on College Gameday at UNC https://t.co/MqGH2psO6i— Stephanie Haberman (@StephLauren) March 7, 2015A win over hated rival Duke today would definitely be the icing on the cake for Reynolds, although he’d probably admit that he’s made out pretty well no matter what happens tonight.last_img read more

The Utah Jazz Might Just Be For Real

Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On this week’s show (March 22, 2018), Neil, Chris and Kyle break down the Houston Rockets’ potential. Has James Harden all but locked up the MVP award this year? And is a Rockets vs. Golden State Warriors Western Conference final inevitable? Next, the Utah Jazz are on an impressive tear, moving up in the playoff rankings despite a crowded field. The crew discusses the Jazz’s success and breaks down the unique challenges facing a small-market team. Plus, a significant digit on the Boston Celtics.Here are links to what the podcast discussed this week:Keep an eye on our 2017-18 NBA predictions, updated after every game.Kyle wrote about the Houston Rockets this week, asking: Why can’t they be the Warriors?The Atlanta Hawks ended the Utah Jazz’s nine-game win streak on Tuesday.Significant Digit: 1-and-884, the record (per ESPN Stats and Info) for NBA teams who trailed by 5 or more points in the final 20 seconds of a game this season. The Boston Celtics are the only team to have won. They stunned the Oklahoma City Thunder Tuesday night by overcoming a 5-point deficit with 16.8 seconds to go. Embed Code By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more